Persimmons

Persimmon tree in Las Nieves, Santa Cruz., La Palma
February 2, 2015

The persimmons are ripe. On La Palma, persimmons are called Kaki or Sharon, and I believe the tree comes from Asia originally. They’re much nicer when really ripe. The catch is that by the time they’re ready for eating, they’ve gone squishy, so they don’t travel well. Personally, I love them with Greek yoghurt.

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Pitahayas

  The fruits of several different cactuses are called pitahayas. The yellow ones in the picture are Hylocereus megalanthus, and the pink ones are Hylocereus undatus. To be honest, I was rather disappointed by the (lack of) flavour of them both. Some time ago I had what I think was a Hylocereus costaricensis, which was deep red all the way through, and much tastier. I wish I had a bigger…

January 7, 2015
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The Pulpo bar/restaurant

The Pulpo bar and restaurant has been open for 40 years down on the beach at Los Cancajos. There were no charter flights to La Palma when the Pulpo opened in 1974, and it was a simple bar just for locals who fancied a beer after their swim. It’s grown over the years and for some time they’ve been serving food too. The menu isn’t that large, but it’s mostly…

August 3, 2014
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Mulberries

Mulberries were originally introduced to the greener parts of La Palma to feed silkworms for silk production. The fruit is a delicious side-effect. Sadly, you rarely see it on sale, because it’s fragile and doesn’t keep. It’s also a strong, natural dye (and is used as such). If you pick your own, expect stained fingers and watch your clothes. In fact, if you’re staying near a mulberry tree in fruit, don’t…

July 30, 2014
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A Stroll by the Sea: Puerto Espindola, Charco Azul and San Andres

La Palma has over 1,000 km of footpaths – everything from challenges for fit people to gentle strolls. One of my favourites is the walk along the coast from Charco-Azul to Puerto Espindola, in the municipality of San Andres and Sauces. Charco Azul has salt-water swimming pools, rather like Piscinas la Fajana. At one time, Puerto Espindola was a working port, mostly exporting the agricultural produce of the borough. Now…

July 8, 2014
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Wrinkly potatoes

Today is Canary Day. Like the national day in most places, it’s an excuse for lots of patriotism. So here’s a picture of some traditional Canarian food – wrinkly potatoes. As you can see, they’re small potatoes, cooked in their skins. Actually they’re boiled in very salty water – you can use sea water – for at least 20 minutes, then allowed to dry with the remaining heat. They come…

May 30, 2014
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